Learn More

Topic Progress:
  • Sexual Violence: An Introduction - Handout

  • African Nova Scotian Community

    A page from the Nova Scotia African Nova Scotian Affairs Website.

  • I Don’t Owe You – Avalon Sexual Assault Centre Campaign

    Avalon Sexual Assault Centre’s “I Don’t Owe You Campaign” is a sexualized violence/abuse awareness and prevention campaign about the complexities of sexual consent, misogyny, male entitlement, bodily autonomy, and empowerment. 

  • Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women - NWAC

    The Native Women’s Association of Canada’s page on Missing and Murdered Indigenous women. Includes various reports, links, and videos.

  • Responding to and Preventing Sexual Violence Project – Paqtnkek Mi’kmaw Nation

    The Paqtnkek Responding to and Preventing Sexual Violence Project was created to respond to the lack of culturally relevant, revitalizing and safe approaches to addressing sexualized violence in their community. The Paqtnkek Health Centre and the Antigonish Women’s Resource Centre & Sexual Assault Services Association worked together to develop Mi’kmaq-specific and community driven initiatives to respond to and prevent sexualized violence.

  • Stop Erasing Sexual Violence Survivors with Disabilities Interview

    Femifesto’s interview with two gender-based violence activists who live with disabilities, Jess Rueger, a queer person with a disability and community mobilizer, and Marianne M. Park, a woman with a disability who has worked in the violence against women field in varying capacities for 28 years.

  • Listen to Sexual Assault Survivors of Colour Interview

    Project Slut founder Andrea Villanueva, a Mexican-based artist with a disability, and Chenthoori Malankov, a Toronto-based Tamil community organizer and advocate, speak to Femifesto about media representation of racialized victims/survivors.

  • Incite! Network of radical feminists of colour

    A U.S.-based network of radical feminists of colour “working to end violence against women, gender non-conforming, and trans people of color, and our communities.” 

  • UBUNTU & MARC Supporting Survivors of Sexual Assault Booklet

    A guide to supporting victim/survivors by UBUNTU, a U.S. based movement “led by women of color and survivors of sexual assault, dedicated to creating a world without sexual violence”, and Men Against Rape Culture. MARC is “a multi-racial, anti-racist organization of men in Durham, NC, committed to ending the epidemic of male violence by attacking it at its roots.”

  • Resources for Trans and Non-Binary Survivors

  • Sexual Violence in Prisons Interview

    Femifesto spoke to Halifax-based African Nova Scotian spoken word artist, teacher and activist El Jones and Mooky Cherian of the Ontario-based Prisoner’s HIV/AIDS Support Action Network (PASAN) about sexual violence in prisons

  • Sexual Violence in Prisons Just Detention International

    Just Detention International is a U.S.-based organization that works with people who are or were incarcerated “to end sexual abuse in all forms of detention”. This site includes first-person accounts of sexual violence.

  • Federal Cyberbullying Law

    Federal cyberbullying law introduced in 2015.

  • No Place to Hide: The Rehtaeh Parsons Story Documentary

    A documentary about Rehtaeh Parsons, a 17-year-old Dartmouth woman, who died by suicide after photos of her alleged gang rape were electronically circulated amongst her peers. Rehtaeh was continuously harassed, slut-shamed, and blamed for her assault.

  • #PressPaws On Cyberviolence Video

    This stop-motion animation video was informed by a survey of girls, young women, and genderqueer and non-binary youth from across Canada on the topic of cyberviolence.

  • Cyber Misogyny Project

    West Coast LEAF - a BC organization dedicated to promoting women’s equality through the law - provides a gender-based analysis of cyber violence.

  • Project Shift: Creating a Safer Digital World for Young Women - A Guide for Trusted Adults

    This is a woman-centred digital literacy resource to help adults support girls and young women experiencing cyberviolence in a compassionate and non-judgemental way.

  • Start By Believing

    Start By Believing is a public awareness campaign that seeks to create positive communities, inform the public, unite allies and supporters, and improve responses to survivors of sexualized violence. Because negative responses can further trauma and foster unaccountable communities, Start By Believing raises awareness dedicated to ending the cycle of silence and moving towards justice and healing for survivors of sexualized violence.

  • Draw the Line

    'Draw The Line' is an interactive campaign that aims to engage Ontarians in a dialogue about sexual violence. The campaign challenges common myths about sexual violence and equips bystanders with information on how to intervene safely and effectively.

  • FORCE

    FORCE: Upsetting Rape Culture is a creative activist collaboration to upset the culture of rape and promote a culture of consent. FORCE designs communications campaigns to generate media attention and get millions of people talking.  

Module Sources

African Nova Scotian Museum, “Slavery”

Black Loyalist Migration

African Nova Scotian Affairs, “African Nova Scotian Community.”

Caroline Alphonso and Marjan Farahbaksh, The Globe and Mail, “Canadian law only changed 26 years ago”

Hilary Beaumont, The Halifax Media Co-op, “Don't Rape (part 2 of 3)”

Kaity Cooper, Rabble.ca, “Cyber-misogyny: The new frontier for hate

Nicole Etherington, Western University Learning Network, Centre for Research and Education on Violence Against Women and Children, “Cyber Misogyny.”

femifesto, “Debunking Myths About Rape in Prison.”

Government of Ontario, “Dispelling the myths about sexual assault.”

INCITE!, “Dangerous Intersections.”

Just Detention

Shaina Luck, CBC Nova Scotia, “Black, Indigenous prisoners over-represented in Nova Scotia jails.”

The National Alliance to End Sexual Violence, “Racism and Rape.”

National Sexual Violence Resource Center, Key Findings From ‘Sexual Violence Victimization and Associations with Health in a Community Sample of African American Women.

Nova Scotia Archives, “African Nova Scotians in the Age of Slavery and Abolition.”

Office of Justice Programs, “Responding to Transgender Victims of Sexual Assault.”

Anjuli Patil, CBC Nova Scotia, “What happened to Rehtaeh Parsons 'just wouldn't happen now,' says mother.

RAINN

Rape Crisis Scotland, “This Is Not An Invitation To Rape Me Briefing Paper”.

Rehtaeh Parsons Society

Maire Sinha (edited by) for the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics, Measuring violence against women: Statistical trends (2013).

This Doesn’t Mean Yes campaign

Trans PULSE, Transgender People in Ontario, Canada Statistics from the Trans PULSE Project to Inform Human Rights Policy.

Tamara Winfrey Harris and Zoe Samudzi, Bitch Magazine, “Being and Reclaiming Ourselves: A Conversation on Sexuality, Respectability, and the Pressures of Black Girlhood”.

UBUNTU and Men Against Rape Culture (MARC), Supporting a Survivor of Sexual Assault.

Jarune Uwujaren, Everyday Feminism, “How Male Sexual Entitlement Hurts Everyone.”

The Wellesley Institute, “Violence Against Women: Why Race Matters.”